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Magic powers of garlic

Magic powers of garlic

I remember very well raw garlic sitting on my farmer grand parents’ dining table at almost every meal. They did not really care about the smell because they appreciated its rich taste and above all its health benefits. My grand mother used it in almost all of her recipes, my mom too and naturally today garlic is one of the essentials of my cuisine.

Its majesty, garlic, is an anti-septic, anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and even, some say, aphrodisiac.

It stimulates the immune system and helps prevent certain cancers and cardiovascular diseases.

Rich in potassium, calcium (contains more calcium than milk!), manganese, phosphorus, iron, copper, selenium and vitamin A, C and B6, it increases the resistance of the immune system. It reduces the risks of stomach, throat, esophagus, colon and ovarian cancer. Garlic is heart’s natural ally because it helps reduce the rate of “bad” cholesterol.

It helps you stay slim.

Poor in calories, it stimulates metabolism and promotes urinary elimination.

Essential ingredient in our “grandmothers’ remedies”.

They would use it against warts and acnes by rubbing a cut garlic clove directly into a pimple. It seems logical having in mind its anti-septic and anti-bacterial proprieties but I did not try it yet myself. On the other hand, I have tested their remedy against colds and flu and it really works: a teaspoon of honey mixed with one small clove of pressed garlic at breakfast every day.

Star of healthy cuisine.

Garlic is easy to store and can be preserved for several months in a dry and dark place. You should try and really integrate it in your eating habits and recipes rather than force yourself to eat it on its own. Before consuming it you may remove the germ which makes the digestion difficult and is mostly responsible for the smell. The best is to eat it raw in order to preserve a maximum of nutrients. You can add it pressed or finely chopped to your salades or salade dressings, your sauces or soups after you turn off the heat. I use it also as an aromatic herb to add flavour and spice up my recipes or boost the taste of ingredients that may seem bland like some pulses for example. And of course always organic, to avoid little doses of poison that come along with non-organic fruit and vegetables.

It is however true that garlic, when eaten raw, trades its magic powers for quite an unpleasant after smell. But there is a remedy to that too, chew some mint or parsley leaves and it will go away.



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